Indian Institute of Cartoonist  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
CARTOONISTS GO BERSERK LAMPOONING THE "FREEDOM OF PRESS"    

Give thought-wielding cartoonists theme like ‘Challenge to the Freedom of the Press,' it's the fearsome Amma who looms large enveloping pen pushers in her shadows.

While most cartoonists across the country chose to lampoon Tamil Nadu Chief Minister J. Jayalalithaa, for her unique stand on freedom of the press, a cartoonist's exhibition has thrown up good works from senior and junior cartoonists and freelancers alike.

The exhibition on the theme is currently on in the city. Organised by the Indian Institute of Cartoonists, it was inaugurated on Thursday by Bangalore University Vice-Chancellor M. S. Thimmappa.

Shyam Mohan from Hyderabad, who wields his art for Andhra Jyothi depicted the Fourth Estate as a flashlight exposing a naked politician with a caption ‘Corruption.' His other toon is of a journalist at the copy table. He has been ‘Suppressed' by a large Jaya plomped on his hand- a symbolic protest.

At another cartoon hanging on the wall, the Veerappan hunt seems to have gone awry. A group of policemen searching for the forest brigand in the dense forest just got a wireless message “We should now hunt for journalists, not Veerapan!” one of them exclaims. This is by Subhani from Decan Chronicle, Hyderabad.

Another cartoon depicted a political cartoonist caught by a constable. “Caught him all these deadly weapons!” he is telling the Inspector. The deadly weapons are a brunch of pens and brushes! This is by Vijay Prasadkar, a freelancer from Pune.

Amma sitting at a table wielding a pen in the shape of a thorny club ready to club journalists sums up the story best. Her table is a prison cell where she has imprisoned two editors. This cartoon is by Narendra, an Express group cartoonist from Bangalore.

Of the 150 cartoons that were received, around 80 have been selected and displayed. Apart from the state, entries were received from Delhi, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. The exhibition would be on at the Karnataka Chitrakala Parishat till January 7.

Express News Service

 































   
THIMMAPPA FOR FREEDOM OF PRESS SANS FRILLS  

Advocating unconditional freedom to media in the country Bangalore University Vice-Chancellor Dr. M. S. Thimmappa expressed concern over the incessant concern over the incessant attacks on the Press during recent times. Speaking after inaugurating a week-long cartoon exhibition on “Challenge to Freedom of Press” he said, a free press is the fundamental agency in any democratic country and it is the duty of the society to safeguard the freedom.

Remarking that all the four pillars of democracy needed to work in tandem for the welfare of the State, he said that the Press had a greater role in this process. Speaking about cartons, he said that cartoons are not just to create humour but also to disseminate powerful messages.

Journalist Arakere Jayaram stressed the need to have merit as the only credential for selection of candidates for the awards. He also said that the Government should consider cartoonists too for the prestigious TSR awards.

He openly supported the candidature of the famous cartoonist B. V. Ramamurthy for the TSR award.

The cartoon exhibition titled, “Challenge to the Freedom of Press” has been organized by the Indian Institute of Cartoonists, in association with the Karnataka Chitrakala Parishat. It will be on till January 7.

Vijay times news

 
   
MAKING LIGHT OF IT ALL  

Cartoon is the true sign of a free media and nothing proves it as strongly as the exhibition now on at the Karnataka Chitrakala Parishat. The theme is, understandably, “Challenge to the Freedom of the Press.”

Most of the cartoons on display are from the national and regional publications in the aftermath of the Tamil Nadu Legislature issuing arrest warrants against five representatives of The Hindu. It was heartening to find how cartoonist in places as far apart as Alwaye in Kerala and Chennapatna in Bangalore district reacted to those eventful days.

Among the works exhibited are those of Keshav, cartoonist of The Hindu. One of his older ones recalls the Defamation Bill contemplated by the late Rajiv Gandhi. Having painted over the stripes of the “Press Tiger” he stands with paint brush in hand, with a smug smile.

There is the New Delhi based cartoonist, Ravishankar's creation: Ms. Jayalalithaa exclaiming “Hey Ram!” when the courts stayed the arrest of The Hindu editor and journalists. There is yet another cartoon which shows Ms. Jayalalithaa telling the police “If they can't get Veerappan, let them get journalists.

One cartoon over which most visitors were seen chuckling shows the Tamil Nadu Chief Minister in the shape of a sky-high cutout telling a wandering angel “we have our divine rights and privileges too.” Another work has her telling the police “forget about militants and their guns, save me from journalists and their pens and cameras.”

T. Mories of Alwaye shows The Hindu Editor-in-Chief N. Ram, towering over Ms. Jayalalithaa, thanks to the intervention of the judiciary.

Vivek Siddapur of Bangalore shows a person painting over a sign at the gate to the Tamil Nadu Legislature to proclaim “Long Live the Freedom Poes Garden.” Vishwanath of Davangere depicts The Hindu attacking assorted politicians with the ultimate weapon labeled “Truth.” The exhibition is on up to January 7.

The Hindu

 
   
WHEN CARTOONS TELL MORE THAN WORDS  

“I may miss news items but I never miss the cartoons,” said Bangalore University Vice Chancellor M. S. Thimmappa. Speaking after inaugurating a cartoon exhibition titled “The challenge to the freedom of press" organized by Indian Institute of Cartoonists at Chitrakala parishat, he said there was a need for unconditional press freedom. Chitrakala Parishat General Secretary D. K. Chouta opined that cartoons were a symbol of common man's protest. “But for cartoonists, probably politicians would have sold the country,” he felt Indian Institute of Cartoonists (IIC) Managing Trustee V. G. Narendra said the IIC had received about 150 cartoons of which about 80 are on display.

Most of the cartoons were Jayalalithaa centric and two of them read “The Mummy returns..,” and “The Tiger eats paper tiger..” The exhibition will be held on January7 at the Chitrakala Parishat.

Deccan Herald News Service

 
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